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4 Essential Fabrics for Pacific Northwest Weather

Posted by Ellie B. on 10/21/2020
4 Essential Fabrics for Pacific Northwest Weather

Here Comes the Sun is not a song often sung in the Pacific Northwest, mostly due to the fact that cold, rainy, high-wind weather tends to be a permanent fixture in the region. The stunning scenery packed with evergreen trees comes at a cost, and that cost is often comfortable temperatures. Still, you don’t want the weather to stop you from enjoying the many outdoor adventures Oregon and Washington have to offer. 


One way to do so is to ensure the outerwear and fabrics accompanying you on said adventures are suitable. For example, cotton is one fiber you’ll likely want to ditch, as it doesn’t wick moisture (making you feel even cooler) and doesn’t protect against wind. 


No matter how you put the following fabrics to use, you’ll definitely want to have them handy before you go exploring the Pacific Northwest. 


Weather Guard Softshell

Weather Guard Softshell is an outerwear fabric best used for jackets, pants, hats, and gloves. It features a Weather Guard Membrane to protect against even the harshest weather conditions. Meanwhile, the Micro Fleece backing retains warmth while still ensuring breathability. It replaces traditional fleece and shell systems that are better suited to dry conditions. 


Garments made from this outerwear fabric are lightweight but still insulative. They’re ideal for skiing, snowboarding, winter climbing, cycling and back-country trekking. 

Polartec Fleece

Designed to be a middle-to-outer layer for your DIY outerwear, Polartec Fleece is the most popular weight because of its incredible warmth. While often used for blankets and throws, it’s also perfect for vests, jackets, mittens, hats, and other outerwear attire. 


Despite its ability to keep you toasty, it’s not a bulky or heavyweight fabric, and therefore is perfect for your autumn explorations.

Hi-Count Nylon

To repel that persistent Northwest rain, you’ll need 2-Ply Hi-Count Taslan Nylon. Its durable, water-resistant finish has wicking capabilities that bode well for outerwear purposes. The versatility of this fabric makes it suitable for rainwear, hiking shorts, and skiwear alike. 

Ten Mile Cloth

Investing in fluorescent Ten Mile Cloth is a must for late evening and night time exploring, or even just for those ultra-overcast days when visibility is low. This fabric is best applied to bags and safety apparel, and you can even use it to sew together a backpack cover. This ensures you can always be seen from behind. 


What’s more, it’s treated with durable water-resistant Scotchguard, as well as rain and stain repellent. It’ll be immune to mold, mildew, and the elements for years to come. Whether it’s for hiking on the weekends or biking to work, it’s sure to be a sound investment. 


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